Bio21 Big Picture Seminar: CSL and the Australian Biomedical Research Sector – Past, Present and Future

Date: 
Thursday, 2 June, 2016 - 17:30
Image: 

Big Picture Seminar: CSL and the Australian Biomedical Research Sector – Past, Present and Future

When: reception 5:30 pm, talk 6:15 pm - 7:15 pm, Thursday, 2 June 2016

Presenter: Dr Andrew Nash, Senior Vice President, Research, CSL Ltd.

Where: Bio21 Institute, David Penington Building, University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville 3010

RSVP: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CQYTVMX

Description:

From its origins as a government funded organisation established 100 years ago CSL has transformed into a leading global biotherapeutics company developing, manufacturing and selling a range of life saving medicines.  Much of CSL’s past success can be attributed to the quality of Australian biomedical research and continued collaboration with this sector will be key to CSL’s future growth. This talk will outline the breadth and success of CSL’s engagement with the sector as well as discuss the importance of nurturing and supporting Australia’s next generation of scientific leaders.

Speaker Biography:

Andrew Nash completed his PhD in immunology at The University of Melbourne in 1988 and, after moving to the Centre for Animal Biotechnology in the Faculty of Veterinary Science, developed and led a research group focused on basic and applied aspects of cytokine biology.  In 1996 he joined the ASX listed biotechnology company Zenyth Therapeutics (then Amrad Corporation) as a senior scientist and subsequently held a number of positions including Director of Biologicals Research and Chief Scientific Officer.  In July of 2005 he was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Zenyth, a position which he held up until the acquisition of Zenyth by CSL Limited in November 2006.  Following the acquisition he was appointed as CSL’s SVP, Research and is currently based at the Bio21 Institute where he leads a large team focused on the discovery and development of new recombinant antibody / protein-based medicines to treat serious human disease.